NCSS: From the Old to the New Jim Crow (presentation)

Thank you for attending our session today at the NCSS (National Council for the Social Studies) Conference in New Orleans. Please feel free to contact either of us:

Below is an unabridged version of our presentation that you can use in the classroom. It includes strategies for talking to students about race, as well as a full array of statistics on mass incarceration.

For classroom materials and embedded links to multimedia, please click on the image below:

The Justice Project Summit

Dan Lawler and I participated in a presentation/panel discussion called, "Inclusive Schools and Education Equity" in which the following questions were posed:

  1. What does it mean to be a welcoming school district within the constraints of segregated housing patterns? 
  2. What can suburban residents do to effect change in a metropolitan system that sanctions separate and unequal educational opportunities? 
  3. Does diversity in schools create a net gain for all?
  • Dan Lawler and Spiro Bolos, New Trier's Metropolitan Community Project
  • Steve Bogira, The Chicago Reader
  • Kourtney Cockrell, Student Enrichment Services at Northwestern University

A Lighthouse

For my Association President's Opening Day speech on the subject of race, I used a publishing platform called "Medium" (iOS app available) because of the beautiful balance it affords between multimedia and text.

A Lighthouse

Technology Integration Presentation at Lake Forest College

Thank you for participating in today's session. Below is an embedded slideshare of the presentation.

Technology Integration in Instruction from Spiro Bolos

Please see the sidebar, "My Other Sites" for links to my school-related blogs.

Richard Prince Case Study (NSFW)

Based on Cariou v. Prince, _ F.3d _ (2d Cir. 2013).

Patrick Cariou published a book of photographs of Rastafarians and landscapes taken in Jamaica. Richard Prince utilized portions of and entire images from Cariou’s photographs in 28 paintings, many of which were shown in the Gagosian Gallery.
Slides are numbered for classroom or workshop: each participant can use the critical reasoning process to make a fair use determination. NOTE: some content may be deemed NSFW. For a detailed analysis, please visit Rebecca Tushnet's "Transformativeness doesn't require commentary on original" as well as Kenneth Crews' analysis of the "Four Factors" at Columbia University (quoted above).

NOTE: click the four expanding arrows on the presentation in order to view full-screen.

UPDATE: the five photos sent back to the lower court were recently the subject of a settlement. Terms were not disclosed.


Although this blog is authored by New Trier High School (NTHS) staff, the audience is global and the views expressed here do not necessarily represent those of NTHS as an institution.

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