Richard Prince Case Study (NSFW)

Based on Cariou v. Prince, _ F.3d _ (2d Cir. 2013).

Patrick Cariou published a book of photographs of Rastafarians and landscapes taken in Jamaica. Richard Prince utilized portions of and entire images from Cariou’s photographs in 28 paintings, many of which were shown in the Gagosian Gallery.
Slides are numbered for classroom or workshop: each participant can use the critical reasoning process to make a fair use determination. NOTE: some content may be deemed NSFW. For a detailed analysis, please visit Rebecca Tushnet's "Transformativeness doesn't require commentary on original" as well as Kenneth Crews' analysis of the "Four Factors" at Columbia University (quoted above).


NOTE: click the four expanding arrows on the presentation in order to view full-screen.

UPDATE: the five photos sent back to the lower court were recently the subject of a settlement. Terms were not disclosed.

Presentation: "Racism and the Undercaste" (NCSS and CASE)

This presentation was given at the NCSS (National Council for the Social Studies) Conference in Seattle, WA, and at the CASE (Council on American Studies Education) Conference at the Art Institute in Chicago by Thomas E. Kucharski and Spiro Bolos, both of New Trier High School.

Using US History, Michelle Alexander's recently published book, The New Jim Crow, and 20th century African-American responses to racism, we will examine strategies for our students' social/political engagement with racism.


Our slides:
 
Racism and the Undercaste from Spiro Bolos

NOTE: to play the presentation fullscreen, click on the "expand" icon in the lower right-hand corner of the presentation box. If you are using a PC, hit "F11" to minimize the browser. 
 

Our handout: 
 

NOTE: to download the handout, click on the "down-arrow" icon in the lower right-hand corner of the document box. You can also print it directly from the browser.


Prison Industrial Complex links and video:

The Prison Industrial Complex from Spiro Bolos on Vimeo.

NOTE: to play the video fullscreen, click on the "expand" icon in the lower right-hand corner of the video box (while playing). If you are using a PC, hit "F11" to minimize the browser. 
 
Downloadable PDF of Zine illustrated and designed by Billy Dee. Music by Loscil.

Presenting Tweets in Chronological Order: A Challenge

For my visit to Smiley and West's The Poverty Tour 2.0 in Alexandria, Virginia, I wanted to document the event for my students and others by using Twitter to broadcast and archive memorable quotes from the hosts and guest speakers.

But finding a site that allowed tweets to be viewed in chronological order proved to be a major challenge until I stumbled upon this function within Storify. For now, the quotes alone will suffice, but I want to learn how to add different forms of media to enrich this "presentation". Check it out below:

The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Students

Thanks to my wonderful sophomore students, I had an opportunity to present, discuss, and solicit feedback regarding my take on Nicholas Carr's book, The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains, a Finalist for the 2011 Pulitzer Prize in General Nonfiction. Because in the future, I am only allotted 50 minutes to present and respond to questions, I've taken my students' feedback and eliminated about 1/3 of the slides. Below appears the unabridged slide deck, including the 2 videos I played when I presented. Enjoy.




District 219 Tech Conference

Thanks to all who attended my breakout sessions at the District 219 Tech Conference, which was conducted under the themes of "1:1 and Web 2.0" on April 9th, 2011 at Niles North High School in Skokie, Illinois. Please feel free to contact me for further information (located in the right sidebar):

For those of you who attended my Blogging session, here is a link that features some of the best student- and teacher-related blog information I have found on the web. I tried to keep the amount of links to a minimum to encourage usage. However, if these are not enough, I have tagged over 200 web pages with the term, "blog", on this site.

The main blogs I author are also linked below:

  1. "An American Studies" — co-authored with John S. O'Connor, my English teaching partner. It features links to all (40+) of our students' individual blogs.
  2. "Modern World History": a class I taught last year which used a different blogging platform called Posterous, somewhat similar to Tumblr. It allows you to post just about anything via email.
  3. "US History": a class I currently teach in an experimental classroom, it also uses the Posterous platform instead of Blogger, my traditional favorite.
For those of you who attended my Copyright and Fair Use session here are some more resources:
Thanks for visiting!


Disclaimer

Although this blog is authored by New Trier High School (NTHS) staff, the audience is global and the views expressed here do not necessarily represent those of NTHS as an institution.

Copyright and Fair Use

This site contains images and excerpts the use of which have not been pre-authorized. This material is made available for the purpose of analysis and critique, as well as to advance the understanding of technology in education. 
The ‘fair use’ of such material is provided for under U.S. Copyright Law. In accordance with U.S. Code Title 17, Section 107, material on this site (along with credit links and/or attributions to original sources) is viewable for educational and intellectual purposes. 
If you are interested in using any copyrighted material from this site for any reason that goes beyond ‘fair use,’ you must first obtain permission from the copyright owner.